Sunday, July 1, 2012

Super summer recipes!

Here are 2 recipes for you to try using great summer vegetables and seafood! 
If you are allergic to any of the ingredients, feel free to substitute with your favorite ingredients.

Remember to cut back on the amount of toxins you ingest, go for organic ingredients.
Also wash your ingredients in water with a tablespoon of vinegar or fresh lemon juice to remove any residues!  Okay, enough prep talk... here are the recipes.


Mango Lime Salmon!

Mango Salmon

Ingredients

1 lb of wild caught salmon filets
1 lime
1 mango
1 tsp Italian spice mix
1Tsp olive oil
Leftover mixed veggies: Chopped garlic, onion, green onion, leeks and red cabbage simmered in 1 tsp of olive oil and 1/2 cup water for 30 min.

Cook Time

10-15 min to cook the salmon. 

Directions

- Turn on the broiler to heat the oven, line a shallow pan with tin foil and coat with olive oil
- Cut the filet into 4 pieces and place in the pan
- Chop up the mango into small pieces and sprinkle on the salmon
- Cut the lime in half and squeeze it over the salmon, sprinkle the Italian spice mix and put it in the broiler.  Check in 5 min to make sure it's not too close to the heating element.  Salmon is done when it just starts to turn white and flakes easily with a fork.
- Serve over veggies.  (I got mine at the Art and Farm Market).  Cut up the rest of the lime into slices and use as garnish.

Nutrition Info

Salmon: From Wiki:  Classified as an oily fish,[81] salmon is considered to be healthful due to the fish's high protein, high omega-3 fatty acids, and high vitamin D[82] content.
Lime: From Wiki: Limes are a good source of vitamin C.
Mango : From Wiki: In mango fruit pulp, the antioxidant vitamins A and C, Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine), folate, other B vitamins and essential nutrients, such as potassium, copper and amino acids, are present. The mango triterpene, lupeol,[37] is an effective inhibitor in laboratory models of prostate and skin cancers.[38][39][40]

 

Shrimp Salad meal... not for the wimpy


Shrimp salad
 

Ingredients

- 5 large shrimp (I bought mine precooked.)
- Mixed organic greens
- Leftover quinoa cooked with green onions
- 1/4 cup roasted garlic hummus
- 1/2 mango
- 1/2 avacado
- 1/2 lime
- Dulse seaweed

Cook Time

- None if you get the shrimp pre-cooked and your quinoa is already done.   Quinoa takes about 20 min.  Bring 2 cups of water in a pot to boil, stir in 1 cup of quinoa and some chopped green onions and cover.  Turn the heat to simmer for 15 min.

Directions

- Chop the mango and mix with the avocado and lime
- Layer the ingredients into a nice bowl.  Start with the greens, then add a 1/4 cup of quinoa, 1/4 cup of hummus, 1/3 mango and rip up some Dulce seaweed to sprinkle on top.  The seaweed is salty so you will not have to add salt to the dish. 

Nutrition Info

Shrimp: Wiki: As with other seafood, shrimp is high in calcium, iodine and protein but low in food energy. A shrimp-based meal is also a significant source of cholesterol, from 122 mg to 251 mg per 100 g of shrimp, depending on the method of preparation.[6] Shrimp consumption, however, is considered healthy for the circulatory system because the lack of significant levels of saturated fat in shrimp means that the high cholesterol content in shrimp actually improves the ratio of LDL to HDL cholesterol and lowers triglycerides.[7]
Leafy greens: wiki: Leaf vegetables are typically low in calories, low in fat, high in protein per calorie, high in dietary fiber, high in iron and calcium, and very high in phytochemicals such as vitamin C, carotenoids, lutein, folate, magnesium as well as vitamin K.
Quinoa: wiki: Quinoa was of great nutritional importance in pre-Columbian Andean civilizations, secondary only to the potato, and was followed in importance by maize. In contemporary times, this crop has become highly appreciated for its nutritional value, as its protein content is very high (18%). Nutritional evaluations of quinoa indicate that it is a source of complete protein.[14][15]
Hummus: Wiki: Hummus is high in iron and vitamin C and also has significant amounts of folate and vitamin B6.[16] The chickpeas make it a good source of protein and dietary fiber; the tahini consists mostly of sesame seeds, which are an excellent source of the amino acid methionine, complementing the proteins in the chickpeas.  
Mango : From Wiki: In mango fruit pulp, the antioxidant vitamins A and C, Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine), folate, other B vitamins and essential nutrients, such as potassium, copper and amino acids, are present. The mango triterpene, lupeol,[37] is an effective inhibitor in laboratory models of prostate and skin cancers.[38][39][40]
Avocado: wiki: About 75% of an avocado's calories come from fat, most of which is monounsaturated fat. On a 100 g basis, avocados have 35% more potassium (485 mg) than bananas (358 mg). They are rich in B vitamins, as well as vitamin E and vitamin K.[30] Avocados have a high fiber content of 75% insoluble and 25% soluble fiber.[31]

Dulse seaweed: livestrong.com: There are 2 g of protein in a 1/3 cup serving of dulse, which satisfies 4 percent of the daily value, based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Although this may not be a substantial amount of protein, it is surprising to find this much protein in such a low-calorie food, which suggests that dulse is a nutrient-dense food.Rich in B vitamins, it supplies 10 percent of the daily value for riboflavin and niacin, 42 percent for B-6 and 23 percent for B-12. While it has no vitamin C and provides only 2 percent of the daily value for calcium, zinc and vitamin A, one 1/3-cup serving provides 19 percent of the daily value for iron and 9 percent for chromium. Vegetarian foods that supply this much iron are very rare. Vegetarians, vegans and those with anemia should consider eating dulse regularly.  Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/389172-dulse-nutrition/#ixzz1zQsWpeRk




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